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The Nintendo Switch already hacked through a known vulnerability?

wololo

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114 Responses

  1. WiiHomebrewr says:

    Already? Wow.

  2. Simon Smith eVestigator here. This by far is an absolute disgrace. Not only does it show the company has no capacity to finish the SDLC. Not only is it unethical practice, but as a Master Software Lifecycle Developer of all levels in industry for 21 years and a Cyber Security Expert and CEO, the payment of $20,000 is in no way any sum of money that would compensate $1 an hour for a Systems Tester, Beta Tester or User Acceptance Tester.

    From a board level perspective, if this is their approach to the Software Development Life Cycle, then I am majorly concerned what their approach is to (if any) their Cyber Security mitigation strategy. This is not only alarming to any professional in the industry to place a ‘bounty’ to take a step outside of the normal phase to bring a product to the market, it is an invitation to invite ‘computer hackers’ not ‘mitigation experts’ to shortcut this very important step.

    I am a reverse engineer, often de-obfuscate malware, and am certified a an ethical hacker. The term ‘hacker’ however is turned upside down here and is essentially ‘technically only’. The mere fact they either don’t have faith or competence in their own staff, or they have not even invested in this core competency gives me reason to believe they operate a company which is a high Cyber Security risk to the world. If this is the approach they take to security, then I wonder how they deal with real Cybersecurity breaches, breaches their ‘hackers’ cannot see. For example internal corporate social engineering of their employee user base that would take an average company 300 days to discover.

    As a true software developer expert from start to finish in this industry, and a Cyber Security expert, I really cannot believe it has come to this. All I can say is, ‘no wonder’.

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