Sony Patents ‘Playstation Remix’, Directly Linked To Gaikai

As it has been noted that Gaikai streaming will be playable in US ‘hopefully’ in mid 2014, just before Sony has decided to file a patent for ‘cloud based emulation’. 

PlayStation have been very quiet on what they have in store for us with Gaikai, but with this recently published US Patent, we get a bit of a better insight as to what they’re up to.

SCE has published a patent known as PlayStation Remix, which seems to be cloud based emulation, but also something else where developers can ‘incorporate new content’ to existing games being emulated, which does make sense being as the name is PS Remix.

Here’s a quick description of part of the service:

methods providing developers to ‘quite easily’ create mini-games within cloud-based, emulated legacy titles. It’s called ‘Suspending State of Cloud-based Legacy Applications’

 

Next up is a description on the basic details of it:

The present disclosure is related to video game emulation. Among other things, this application describes a method and apparatus for emulating a video game that includes generating snapshots that can be used for incorporating new content into the emulated video games.

 

It’s no doubt that this’ll be used to stream ‘legacy’ games to the PS4, but I’m very interested in the ‘remix’ part of the service, adding new content to existing games….. I wonder.

Here’s a few more bits of information on the page:

 

[0006] Finding new ways to play preexisting video games can increase the longevity of older games. Instead of replaying the same level or completing the same missions repeatedly, gamers often desire new challenges when replaying legacy games. In response to this need, game designers have begun to produce mini-games. Within a mini-game, the gamer can be instructed to complete new objectives or challenge their friends for high scores in a format that was not originally designed into the legacy game. Further, since the mini-game is derived from a legacy game, the gamer already knows the characters and basic components of the game, and is therefore more likely to play the mini-game. 

[0007] Mini-games often do not begin at traditional starting points that were used in the original game. For example, the mini-game may begin near the end of a level, just prior to facing a final opponent, or the boss of the level. A boss is an enemy-based challenge which is found in many video games. Bosses are generally seen at the climax of a particular section of the game, usually at the end of a stage or level. Due to the climactic nature of fighting a boss, mini-game designers may choose to use this section of the game as their starting point. In order to make the mini-game more challenging than the original version, the game designer may also want to limit the number of lives a player may use, or change other game parameters such as the amount of health the main character has remaining Other game scenarios may be chosen as starting points for a min-game. For example a mini-game may begin with the game player being the batter in a baseball game where there are two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning and the batter’s team is down by one run. 

[0008] However, in order to generate mini-games that start with these specific circumstances a game designer must reverse engineer the underlying code in each game and then rewrite the code to enable the mini-game to start under these specific conditions. This process is time consuming and expensive, because it may require multiple engineers to redevelop a single legacy game. Additionally since mini-games are shorter than full-length games, there is a need to produce mini-games in larger quantities.

 

 

Above the few paragraphs shows some other patents that SCE seem to have filed for, and here they are:

[0002] This application is related to commonly-assigned, co-pending provisional application Ser. No. 61/666,628, (Attorney Docket Number SCEA12004US00) filed Jun. 29, 2012, and entitled “DETERMINING TRIGGERS FOR CLOUD-BASED EMULATED GAMES”, the entire disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

[0003] This application is related to commonly-assigned, co-pending provisional application Ser. No. 61/666,645, (Attorney Docket Number SCEA12005US00) filed Jun. 29, 2012, and entitled “HAPTIC ENHANCEMENTS FOR EMULATED VIDEO GAME NOT ORIGINALLY DESIGNED WITH HAPTIC CAPABILITIES”, the entire disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

[0004] This application is related to commonly-assigned, co-pending provisional application Ser. No. 61/666,665, (Attorney Docket Number SCEA12005US00) filed Jun. 29, 2012, and entitled “CONVERSION OF HAPTIC EVENTS INTO SCREEN EVENTS”, the entire disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

 

The first one I could only comprehend as somehow using triggers for PS2/PS1 games, and the second one seems interesting, if this is attatched to Gaikai, this confirms there’ll be PS1 games to play as ‘Haptic enhancements’ comes under vibration feedback, so for the few PS1 games that never had the use of dualshock’s capabilities, this would mean they will be ‘remixed’ to have ‘haptic enhancements’

The third one, I’m completely lost at. But anyway, here’s some pretty photos to look at:


 

Oohh, how interesting!

  1. Ninjakakashi’s avatar

    Pictures are quite simple:o

    Reply

    1. Minimur12’s avatar

      For patent they usually are, getting the point across without giving too much away,and hey, they don’t need to be picasso drawings, right? lol

      Reply

      1. mlc’s avatar

        I’m pretty sure using Picasso for your patent application could only hurt you; He’s often too abstract.

        *ba dum shh*

        =( sorrylol

        Reply

        1. McLoven’s avatar

          lol ^^LIKE^^

          Reply

  2. Sonofskywalker3’s avatar

    I would say that “Determining Triggers” rather than meaning the use of physical trigger buttons (which the ps1 had) refers to the act of determining which in game “triggers” or events will cause a mini-game to launch instead of the legacy code. For example, in a mega man game where they replaced one of the robot masters, the trigger could be opening the boss door. when the door opens the emulated game stops running the legacy code and runs the new code, and you see the different boss.

    I agree the second point seems quite obvious.

    The third I would say is exactly what it sounds like, conversion of haptic (vibration) events into screen (visual) events. I don’t know why this would be useful other than for using vita remote play or a vita version of playstation remix. since the vita doesn’t vibrate, it could take those vibration signals and convert them into, maybe a screen shake or flash.

    Just my two cents worth.

    Reply

    1. mlc’s avatar

      ^ This. It’s presumably about the methods by which they plan to find and utilize particular variables and (perhaps with more difficulty) particular portions/scenes/action segments in the game.

      If I want my minigame to be the Bowser boss battle in X Mario game, I care about the literal code/emulated functions to find and start that specific battle, along with the end and the variables affecting things like health, speed, and (perhaps, if I want some sort of custom menu) when the game ends due to Mario and Bowser dying. They are presumably working on a way to make this easier or more automated, as opposed to making every minigame from a “new” game require someone to pore over the entire compiled code of the game. (i.e. if you know all games using engine x or made by this specific developer will have event/action sequences that start in a particular way, you look for only those types of events and only those which have “boss” variables or occur in a general range where the specific desired minigame is probably found)

      I honestly despise the sorts of things they’ll give patents for, though. If a method is obvious given current knowledge, even that of a layman, you shouldn’t be able to claim exclusive control of it. It seems to me that the limitations on who has access to the old compiled code, plus the new code Sony creates for this purpose, would prevent any actual harmful competition. (Sony isn’t going to be doing this to Nintendo games, and Nintendo won’t be doing it to Sony, until one or the other exits the market)

      Reply

    2. GuitaristMatt’s avatar

      Yes like achievement triggers from a previous patent.

      Reply

  3. Lennyvita’s avatar

    Cloud based games sucks. you are dependent on internet connection and the service itself. it is bad enough to connect online and use online servers.

    Some people have internet bandwidth caps, this only costs more streaming games.

    The PS4 is more than capable of playing PS3/PS2/PSX games but NO that wouldn’t make money for $ony. The bottom line is $$$$. So for PS3 games, well ill stick to my PS3 and those that have a backwards compatible PS3 good for you.

    Reply

    1. mlc’s avatar

      My biggest problem with them is games that only ever come out as online or cloud games. I can’t go back and relive Everquest unless someone remakes it or the company rereleases it. Probably one of the biggest reasons that I rarely miss Japanese-exclusive phone games, since I figure I’ll never have the time to play and understand enough to enjoy it. And then it will inevitably be gone forever in a short time, barring a rerelease on a console.

      But Sony is essentially targeting a more “general” audience with these scammy cloud services. Most of us older gamers that have collected games over the years will have maintained/kept at least the very best of that collection, and therefore will be inclined to emulate or use a previous console. Computer savvy people will also be inclined to emulate many older games as well, if the only other option to get the content is to subscribe. So this technique can easily be successful and make up for the downsides in numbers of users and the demographic targeted, but the strength of the minigames and new content will determine how many long time gamers join in.

      But I agree, without some really low pricing and high quality, there is very little that can encourage people to prefer this to emulation. (Sony’s argument could easily be cost of hardware, though, if BC PS3′s were an indication) Rom hacks and websites can already let you do some of this stuff, so Sony needs to be *really* novel while tying in “social network” type competition features to the new minigames.

      Reply

    2. Acid_Snake’s avatar

      You are partially wrong. The PS4 can’t play PS3 games without PS3 hardware inside, it may be able to emulate the RSX, but emulating the Cell Processor is far out of question, PS1 games are also out of the question due to the lack of CD playback, only PS2 games can be played from disc. But as we all know, Sony no longer cares about backwards compatibility, they stopped caring a LONG time ago when they realized there was money in reselling the same games over and over and over again, so you are right on the money part.

      Reply

  4. Hazer7’s avatar

    They better enable PS2 games.
    And some PC games.

    Reply

  5. mlc’s avatar

    Oh, I didn’t even look at the diagrams. The diagrams themselves show that they’re planning to take a “snapshot” of the “physical” state of the emulated game at the start of a battle, and another at the end of the battle, and then perhaps emulate and run only what is required for that portion of the game?

    It really depends on the purpose of “suspension request” (it could be something silly like pause, lol), but I hope they have a complicated method of doing this. This idea is too obvious.

    Reply

  6. DudeGuy’s avatar

    Hopefully they also use it to enhance games by adding new elements. I remember playing around with lua scripts for an NES emulator that added a map and a menu to turn off and on abilities for the original Metroid. It really made the game a lot better for people who prefer the system from Super Metroid.

    Reply

  7. Valhalla’s avatar

    What I would really love to see is some kind of cloud based hybrid emulation that relies on assets we already have on a disc… But just does all of the difficult calculations in the cloud before transposing them onto our assets somehow. For instance maybe they could just emulate the last 20% of a PS3 on the PS4 then do the rest of the work in the cloud.

    Reply

    1. Valhalla’s avatar

      Of course this is just a pipe dream that probably isn’t even possible. :(

      Reply

  8. Hazer7’s avatar

    If PSnow comes out they should let nonPS+members/Unsubscribed members to play some demos. Maybe for a limited time at least.

    Effects:

    *Lower the memory cards and HD sales.
    *PS3 Market could take a hit.(b/c rental services).
    *Decrease intensive towards Piracy.
    *Happy Vita gamers :)

    (Honestly I think Sony will lose money unless the Subscription $ is really high)

    Reply

  9. fithry12’s avatar

    noob guide to install TNV4 for PS VITA to play ISO games

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6AavfZ21Lc

    Reply

  10. jeje’s avatar

    waaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhh they release the ps vita 2000 i feel bad now that our old vita is not the newest anymore… :( i hope they release it between 2015..

    Reply

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